Tuesday, August 15, 2006


So it was another year of RHC for us this past weekend and yes, it was just as exhausting as ever.

This picture is from lunch on the second day. Ana and I were just finished eating and Ana had picked up on the fact that I was doing photography for the camp. She wanted to help, so she took the camera and went around the lunch area with it. This is one of her shots.

Since the camp is run completely by volunteers, things are always a bit cattywhompus. This year was no exception although I would say it was the smoothest camp that I have been to in the last three years of going.

This year Henry was much more solid and Ana was the one who was falling apart. She erupted into tears the morning of the second day and we never could quite pinpoint a specific problem. I noticed first off that she wasn't eating her breakfast and I asked her about it. She tried to avoid the question and then burst into tears. When I asked what the problem was she said her back hurt. I looked at her back and found a bruise from roller skating the night before but didn't think this was the real problem. We talked some. I didn't want to put words in her mouth I really wanted her to be able to frame/express the problem herself but that just wasn't happening this time. Finally I asked if it was just hard to be here with so many other children who were also from Russia and were also adopted. She said it was hard and that made me cry, which she found amusing and so we smiled through our tears.

This is a new behavior for her and overall I think a positive one although upsetting all around. The idea that she can't stuff all these emotions away anymore is important. But it also means that we have to deal with them. I'm worried about third grade, I'm afraid that this is going to be a pretty tough year for our Ana.

Sigh,
Amy Posted by Picasa

2 comments:

Chris said...

Dear Amy,

Thank you for your thoughtful comments on my blog. You are entirely correct and a lot of OT researchers could learn from your frustration over this topic. I blogged about Wilbarger protocol on another occasion at http://abctherapeutics.blogspot.com/2006/04/wilbarger-approach-how-patient-should.html

Anecdotal evidence is still evidence, but it doesn't satisfy me either. I think we need to do a lot better than anecdote if we expect interventions to be accepted.

I won't make excuses for the lack of evidence and research. Given the popularity of the approach and the amount of money that was generated in promoting the technique it really is unacceptable.

My best to you and your daughter.

Sincerely,
Chris Alterio

Chris said...

Dear Amy,

Thank you for your thoughtful comments on my blog. You are entirely correct and a lot of OT researchers could learn from your frustration over this topic. I blogged about Wilbarger protocol on another occasion at http://abctherapeutics.blogspot.com/2006/04/wilbarger-approach-how-patient-should.html

Anecdotal evidence is still evidence, but it doesn't satisfy me either. I think we need to do a lot better than anecdote if we expect interventions to be accepted.

I won't make excuses for the lack of evidence and research. Given the popularity of the approach and the amount of money that was generated in promoting the technique it really is unacceptable.

My best to you and your daughter.

Sincerely,
Chris Alterio